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Jan 22 2014
Yale Urban Ecosystem Services Symposium
New Tools To Guide Ecosystem Management In An Urbanizing World

Panel 3: Coastal Adaptation and Resilience to Storm Events and Sea Level Rise

Time 3:00-4:00

Organizers:Alex Felson (Moderator), Keri Enright-Kato, Marit Larson, Jamie Ong, Beth Tellman


Speaker/Panel Discussion Format:  

 Introduction of panelists and framing of issues, 5 min  

Alex Felson, Assistant Professor, Yale University

Applying ecosystem services more effectively for long term coastal adaptation planning 


Panelists presentations answering questions, 10 min each

Denise Reed, Chief Scientist, Water Institute of the Gulf

How can we further integrate scientific information through the ecosystem services framework as a common language to inform ecosystem-based policy and planning for coastal adaptation?

Roselle Henn, Chief, USACE North Atlantic Division 

What are examples of useful methods and tools for facilitating coastal adaptation in terms of government, economics, infrastructure and, community activism in the local, regional, and national political context? 

 Gavin Smith, Associate Research Professor UNC; Executive Director UNC & Homeland

Given the importance of risk reduction and hazard mitigation planning, how can we link these planning tools to ecosystem services, including where and how we build in relation to natural hazards? How can we address the many trade offs associated with coastal adaptation planning given that places where people want to live are also high hazard areas (e.g. future land developments risks and ecosystem service impacts)?

 Dan Zarrilli, PE | Director of Resiliency 
NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainability

What lessons have we learned from large urban areas such as New York about reducing risks and increasing ecosystem services? Are these ideas transferable? What knowledge gaps and data needs are necessary for advancing coastal adaptation initiatives?   


Panel Discussion , 10 min
Questions from the Audience , 5 min

What ecosystem services are relevant for coastal adaptation and long-term adaptive management? How well are these ES documented and incorporated into the models used by NOAA, FEMA and USACE to address risks and work on hazard planning? In working on the challenging effort to retrofit urban coastal land, how much data is needed? How do we couple data driven models with action oriented agendas and regulations?

Yale Urban Ecosystem Services Symposium

New Tools To Guide Ecosystem Management In An Urbanizing World

Panel 3: Coastal Adaptation and Resilience to Storm Events and Sea Level Rise

Time 3:00-4:00

Organizers:Alex Felson (Moderator), Keri Enright-Kato, Marit Larson, Jamie Ong, Beth Tellman

Speaker/Panel Discussion Format:  

 Introduction of panelists and framing of issues, 5 min  

Alex Felson, Assistant Professor, Yale University

Applying ecosystem services more effectively for long term coastal adaptation planning

Panelists presentations answering questions, 10 min each

Denise Reed, Chief Scientist, Water Institute of the Gulf

How can we further integrate scientific information through the ecosystem services framework as a common language to inform ecosystem-based policy and planning for coastal adaptation?

Roselle Henn, Chief, USACE North Atlantic Division

What are examples of useful methods and tools for facilitating coastal adaptation in terms of government, economics, infrastructure and, community activism in the local, regional, and national political context?

 Gavin Smith, Associate Research Professor UNC; Executive Director UNC & Homeland

Given the importance of risk reduction and hazard mitigation planning, how can we link these planning tools to ecosystem services, including where and how we build in relation to natural hazards? How can we address the many trade offs associated with coastal adaptation planning given that places where people want to live are also high hazard areas (e.g. future land developments risks and ecosystem service impacts)?

 Dan Zarrilli, PE | Director of Resiliency 
NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainability

What lessons have we learned from large urban areas such as New York about reducing risks and increasing ecosystem services? Are these ideas transferable? What knowledge gaps and data needs are necessary for advancing coastal adaptation initiatives?   

Panel Discussion , 10 min

Questions from the Audience , 5 min

What ecosystem services are relevant for coastal adaptation and long-term adaptive management? How well are these ES documented and incorporated into the models used by NOAA, FEMA and USACE to address risks and work on hazard planning? In working on the challenging effort to retrofit urban coastal land, how much data is needed? How do we couple data driven models with action oriented agendas and regulations?


Oct 10 2013

Constructing Future Nature: Ethical conundrums in the design of ecosystems

Organizer/Moderator: Alex Felson

 Ben Minteer, Arizona State University: The Fall of the Wild? The Ecological Ethics of Preservation, Restoration, and Design in the Anthropocene.     

 Eric Higgs, University of Victoria, Australia: Back to a future landscape: prospects for ecological restoration.

Alex Felson, Yale University: Shaping ecosystems through ecological land planning and research-based design.   

Joy Zedler, University of Wisconsin: Embracing uncertainty: Looking back while planning ahead.

 

Overview:

Humans are negatively impacting ecosystems locally and changing global climates. This generates a need not only to restore impaired ecosystems but to construct new ecosystems that are resilient and sustainable within a changing environment. As the demand for constructed ecosystems expands, restoration ecologists, along with other applied ecologists, are poised to address the challenge of reclaiming and restoring degraded, damaged and destroyed ecosystems and to serve as critical players in shaping the ecosystems of the future. Yet the base assumptions that have guided the field of restoration ecology for decades, including the reliance on historical reference sites in an effort to return habitats to pre-disturbance conditions, are being questioned. Restoration ecologists are obliged to reconsider how to model future ecosystems.  They face ethical challenges associated with defining the appropriateness of native versus non-native species in urbanized landscapes. For example, should wildlife habitat preservation and enhancement or public access be valued more in urban parkland? Should ecologists assist in facilitating the migration of plant and animal communities affected by global warming?

 

This symposium will explore possible roles for restoration ecologists in defining and establishing ecosystems of the future particularly in suburban areas or urbanized coasts. It will examine the ethical, cultural, and functional challenges of constructing ecosystems.  Topics include: engaging the public through outreach and education; situating restoration projects in urbanized landscapes; integrating technology, research and design into restoration projects; and responding to shifting understandings of environmental responsibility in an era of rapid environmental change.


Aug 11 2013
Photo taken by Tim Carter, From left: Alex Felson, Steward Pickett, Wendi Goldsmith, Larry Baker, Jennifer Rice, and Erle Ellis
Ecological Society of America Symposium August 8, 2013

Past, Present, & Future Design of Infrastructure(s) for a Resilient Society        Organized by: Tim Carter, Erle Ellis and Alex Felson 
Human systems rely not only on built infrastructures (roads, pipes, etc) but 
also on the social, cultural, and ecological infrastructures that are 
inseparable from the physical spaces we inhabit.  This symposium will bring
 environmental historians, designers, political ecologists, geographers and 
other environmental scientists together with esteemed ecologists to build on
 the interdisciplinary space created by the conference theme: ” Sustainable
 Pathways: Learning From the Past and Shaping the Future”.

in-fruh-struhk-cher the basic, underlying framework of a system or organization
1) Infrastructures are not simply physical; 2) The past has shaped the present conditions, but may not determine the future, particularly when resiliency is considered; 3) Ecologists can (should?) play a role in the design of our current and future infrastructures.


Presentation Topics:  Erle Ellis. Human infrastructure as ecological infrastructure for the Anthropocene.  Wendi Goldsmith. The role of green infrastructure in urban landscape planning and design. Jennifer Rice. Social and Political Infrastructures of resilience: Cities as leaders in climate change governance? Larry Baker. Envisioning Resilient futures for urban water and waste. Steward Pickett. Resilience in Ecology and Urban Design. Alexander Felson. The role of ecologists in informing future nature (infrastructure).

 

 

Photo taken by Tim Carter, From left: Alex Felson, Steward Pickett, Wendi Goldsmith, Larry Baker, Jennifer Rice, and Erle Ellis

Ecological Society of America Symposium August 8, 2013

Past, Present, & Future Design of Infrastructure(s) for a Resilient Society        Organized by: Tim Carter, Erle Ellis and Alex Felson

Human systems rely not only on built infrastructures (roads, pipes, etc) but 
also on the social, cultural, and ecological infrastructures that are 
inseparable from the physical spaces we inhabit.  This symposium will bring
 environmental historians, designers, political ecologists, geographers and 
other environmental scientists together with esteemed ecologists to build on
 the interdisciplinary space created by the conference theme: ” Sustainable
 Pathways: Learning From the Past and Shaping the Future”.

in-fruh-struhk-cher
the basic, underlying framework of a system or organization

1) Infrastructures are not simply physical; 2) The past has shaped the present conditions, but may not determine the future, particularly when resiliency is considered; 3) Ecologists can (should?) play a role in the design of our current and future infrastructures.

Presentation Topics:  Erle Ellis. Human infrastructure as ecological infrastructure for the Anthropocene.  Wendi Goldsmith. The role of green infrastructure in urban landscape planning and design. Jennifer Rice. Social and Political Infrastructures of resilience: Cities as leaders in climate change governance? Larry Baker. Envisioning Resilient futures for urban water and waste. Steward Pickett. Resilience in Ecology and Urban Design. Alexander Felson. The role of ecologists in informing future nature (infrastructure).

 

 


Apr 14 2012
Alex Felson participated as a presenter and panelist in the event Urban Planet: Emerging Ecologies at the Cooper Union on April 10th. 
Two questions raised were:"Ecological understanding of urban constructed ecosystems is seminal. Scientists are seeking new ways to develop that knowledge towards understanding urban environments and defining sustainable ecosystems. At the same time, designers are incorporating ecological understanding and attempting to define sustainable urban ecosystems of the future.1.     Design practitioners often filter ecological concepts and understanding into design even though those concepts are not easily translated from one field to the next and the ecological data as well as theoretical frameworks are incomplete.  What then are the professional boundaries designers should acknowledge and how can those boundaries be overcome particularly when working with incomplete information from scientists and the uncertainty embedded in scientific results?2.     Environmental consultants often form part of design teams.  Their input however into the design process is constrained and largely aims to satisfy developers’ interests and regulations which may not be based on the best available science. How can we enhance transdisciplinary approach across the design and ecology disciplines to ensure a more meaningful integration of ecology and design for the built environment?” 

Alex Felson participated as a presenter and panelist in the event Urban Planet: Emerging Ecologies at the Cooper Union on April 10th. 

Two questions raised were:
"Ecological understanding of urban constructed ecosystems is seminal. Scientists are seeking new ways to develop that knowledge towards understanding urban environments and defining sustainable ecosystems. At the same time, designers are incorporating ecological understanding and attempting to define sustainable urban ecosystems of the future.

1.     Design practitioners often filter ecological concepts and understanding into design even though those concepts are not easily translated from one field to the next and the ecological data as well as theoretical frameworks are incomplete.  What then are the professional boundaries designers should acknowledge and how can those boundaries be overcome particularly when working with incomplete information from scientists and the uncertainty embedded in scientific results?

2.     Environmental consultants often form part of design teams.  Their input however into the design process is constrained and largely aims to satisfy developers’ interests and regulations which may not be based on the best available science. How can we enhance transdisciplinary approach across the design and ecology disciplines to ensure a more meaningful integration of ecology and design for the built environment?”