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Mar 3 2014

The Urban Ecology and Design Lab at Yale is deeply involved in the Rebuild by Design competition working on coastal adaptation in Bridgeport with the WB Unabridged + Yale and Arcadis team.  See the attached workshop above which occurred over the weekend. A second event will occur on March 8th in Bridgeport. Here is the link to our team website: http://www.rebuildbydesign.org/teams/unabridged/

More information to come…


Jan 22 2014
Yale Urban Ecosystem Services Symposium
New Tools To Guide Ecosystem Management In An Urbanizing World

Panel 3: Coastal Adaptation and Resilience to Storm Events and Sea Level Rise

Time 3:00-4:00

Organizers:Alex Felson (Moderator), Keri Enright-Kato, Marit Larson, Jamie Ong, Beth Tellman


Speaker/Panel Discussion Format:  

 Introduction of panelists and framing of issues, 5 min  

Alex Felson, Assistant Professor, Yale University

Applying ecosystem services more effectively for long term coastal adaptation planning 


Panelists presentations answering questions, 10 min each

Denise Reed, Chief Scientist, Water Institute of the Gulf

How can we further integrate scientific information through the ecosystem services framework as a common language to inform ecosystem-based policy and planning for coastal adaptation?

Roselle Henn, Chief, USACE North Atlantic Division 

What are examples of useful methods and tools for facilitating coastal adaptation in terms of government, economics, infrastructure and, community activism in the local, regional, and national political context? 

 Gavin Smith, Associate Research Professor UNC; Executive Director UNC & Homeland

Given the importance of risk reduction and hazard mitigation planning, how can we link these planning tools to ecosystem services, including where and how we build in relation to natural hazards? How can we address the many trade offs associated with coastal adaptation planning given that places where people want to live are also high hazard areas (e.g. future land developments risks and ecosystem service impacts)?

 Dan Zarrilli, PE | Director of Resiliency 
NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainability

What lessons have we learned from large urban areas such as New York about reducing risks and increasing ecosystem services? Are these ideas transferable? What knowledge gaps and data needs are necessary for advancing coastal adaptation initiatives?   


Panel Discussion , 10 min
Questions from the Audience , 5 min

What ecosystem services are relevant for coastal adaptation and long-term adaptive management? How well are these ES documented and incorporated into the models used by NOAA, FEMA and USACE to address risks and work on hazard planning? In working on the challenging effort to retrofit urban coastal land, how much data is needed? How do we couple data driven models with action oriented agendas and regulations?

Yale Urban Ecosystem Services Symposium

New Tools To Guide Ecosystem Management In An Urbanizing World

Panel 3: Coastal Adaptation and Resilience to Storm Events and Sea Level Rise

Time 3:00-4:00

Organizers:Alex Felson (Moderator), Keri Enright-Kato, Marit Larson, Jamie Ong, Beth Tellman

Speaker/Panel Discussion Format:  

 Introduction of panelists and framing of issues, 5 min  

Alex Felson, Assistant Professor, Yale University

Applying ecosystem services more effectively for long term coastal adaptation planning

Panelists presentations answering questions, 10 min each

Denise Reed, Chief Scientist, Water Institute of the Gulf

How can we further integrate scientific information through the ecosystem services framework as a common language to inform ecosystem-based policy and planning for coastal adaptation?

Roselle Henn, Chief, USACE North Atlantic Division

What are examples of useful methods and tools for facilitating coastal adaptation in terms of government, economics, infrastructure and, community activism in the local, regional, and national political context?

 Gavin Smith, Associate Research Professor UNC; Executive Director UNC & Homeland

Given the importance of risk reduction and hazard mitigation planning, how can we link these planning tools to ecosystem services, including where and how we build in relation to natural hazards? How can we address the many trade offs associated with coastal adaptation planning given that places where people want to live are also high hazard areas (e.g. future land developments risks and ecosystem service impacts)?

 Dan Zarrilli, PE | Director of Resiliency 
NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainability

What lessons have we learned from large urban areas such as New York about reducing risks and increasing ecosystem services? Are these ideas transferable? What knowledge gaps and data needs are necessary for advancing coastal adaptation initiatives?   

Panel Discussion , 10 min

Questions from the Audience , 5 min

What ecosystem services are relevant for coastal adaptation and long-term adaptive management? How well are these ES documented and incorporated into the models used by NOAA, FEMA and USACE to address risks and work on hazard planning? In working on the challenging effort to retrofit urban coastal land, how much data is needed? How do we couple data driven models with action oriented agendas and regulations?


Dec 4 2013

The SOA/FES joint degree students as part of the new Student Initiated Group BE^2 organized a field trip for architecture and forestry students to the Whitney Water Treatment Tour.


Lectured at MIT’s DUSP for the Environmental Policy and Planning Group on November 12th.

Lectured at MIT’s DUSP for the Environmental Policy and Planning Group on November 12th.


Nov 21 2013

Future Directions in Urban Ecology and Ecological Design.
Tuesday, November 19th   
4:00 – 5:45
Burke Auditorium


Join Urban Ecologists Peter Groffman, Diane Pataki and Alex Felson as they engage in a discussion with Yale School of Architecture faculty about urban ecological theories, methods, and tools.
 Brainstorm with them on methods to translate scientific information into tangible meaning for design.
 
Questions to be raised are:
-        How do we choose what metrics to study and what methods to apply for design?
-        How should we move forward in designing and constructing buildings and landscapes and measure their performance?
-        Are there design enhancements that can affect ecological processes and improve the environmental performance of urban areas?
-        How can experiments be implemented to study/design ecosystem process interactions in urban and suburban areas?


Nov 19 2013

ASLA 2013

PERFORMATIVE MOSAICS FOR URBAN TREES

Janet Rosenberg

Lydia Scott

Alex Felson

Peter del Tredici

BRIDGING  SCIENCE AND DESIGN: ECOLOGISTS REFLECT ON LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Symposium moderator: Alex Felson

Jill Baron

Steward Pickett

Peter Groffman

Diane Pataki


Nov 14 2013

The current issue of BioScience 2013 includes two articles, a feature and the cover on the design process and on the MillionTrees (NY-CAP) project.  Here is the link


Nov 10 2013

Sooner or Later at Seaside: An experimental effort by Alexander J. Felson, ASLA, to protect a shoreline neighborhood in Bridgeport, Connecticut, from frequent flooding shows how hard it is to make a whole community appreciate the existential threat of climate change. By Arthur Allen. Landscape Architecture Magazine, November 2013: 188-197.

THE YALE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR ALEXANDER J. FELSON, ASLA,
brings landscape architecture and ecology together in what he calls “designed experiments”—projects that test green urban design and management hypotheses but that also meet practical needs. In 2010, he came to Seaside Village, a century-old brick Georgia revival complex in Bridgeport, Connecticut, where the homeowners association had asked Yale’s Urban Design Workshop and the Urban Ecology and Design Lab to develop a master plan for the 257-unit community. Seaside Village is enveloped in the shade of beautiful red oaks, lindens, and silver maples but floods badly during heavy rains.
At first it seemed like a marriage made in heaven.
Felson, an assistant professor at Yale, runs a joint degree program between the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the School of Architecture. He has a master’s degree in landscape architecture from Harvard University and a PhD in ecology from Rutgers University. As a designer and researcher for MillionTreesNYC, the planting project in New York City, he helped devise a series of experimental plots to study urban forest health over time in different soils and settings. Seaside Village was a site with great symbolic interest, a place where idealisms past and present could meet. There were, however, big problems that come with working on former wetlands within a 100-year floodplain, on the fringe of a threatened coastline where flooding is common. Poor drainage plagues Seaside Village, which lies below high-tide levels on pancake-flat land. After a normal heavy rain, drains back up and fill the neighborhood. An inch of precipitation can leave six or seven inches of water on the streets, and most basements flood regularly. A glance at the 1893 U.S. Geological Survey map of the area shows why: The land where Seaside Village now sits once lay under a marshy inlet of the Long Island Sound.


Nov 7 2013
A Roadmap for Embedding Ecologists into Urban Design
Earlier this year, Alexander Felson suggested that the field of urban design would improve markedly if ecologists became more involved. But as Felson conceded, many ecologists have scant experience working on development projects and might not even know where to begin.  In a new article, Felson, an assistant professor at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the Yale School of Architecture, lays out a “roadmap” for integrating ecology into urban design. Writing in the journal BioScience, Felson describes strategies for ecologists to inject themselves into design projects — such as urban parks and buildings — and highlights critical moments in the process when they can have the greatest impact… more 
Quotes: 
“It’s ideal to get involved early in the contract phase because essentially you’re carving out your role in a project.”


“Land development is inevitable… and it’s happening with less ecological assessment than it should be. The more we can get ecologist involved the better.”

A Roadmap for Embedding Ecologists into Urban Design

Earlier this year, Alexander Felson suggested that the field of urban design would improve markedly if ecologists became more involved. But as Felson conceded, many ecologists have scant experience working on development projects and might not even know where to begin.
 
In a new article, Felson, an assistant professor at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the Yale School of Architecture, lays out a “roadmap” for integrating ecology into urban design. Writing in the journal BioScience, Felson describes strategies for ecologists to inject themselves into design projects — such as urban parks and buildings — and highlights critical moments in the process when they can have the greatest impact… more

Quotes:
It’s ideal to get involved early in the contract phase because essentially you’re carving out your role in a project.
Land development is inevitable… and it’s happening with less ecological assessment than it should be. The more we can get ecologist involved the better.

Nov 4 2013
Guilford takes the long view on climate change
By Jan Ellen Spiegel
Monday, November 4, 2013

Guilford — Ten days before the one-year anniversary of storm Sandy’s sweep through the coastal flanks of this shoreline community, town planner George Kral surveys an area that took one of the storm’s hardest hits -– Seaside Avenue. “The road was totally inundated,” he recounted. “All of the houses had water in their basements for sure or up into the first floor depending on the exact elevation of the road.” Appropriate to its name, on this sunny, if chilly, Friday afternoon, Seaside Avenue offers an array of vistas of Long Island Sound as the road transects what in earlier times was a seaside salt marsh. “…  Visit this link for the whole story on “Seaside Avenue erased?
Coastal Resilience Plan link

Guilford takes the long view on climate change

Guilford — Ten days before the one-year anniversary of storm Sandy’s sweep through the coastal flanks of this shoreline community, town planner George Kral surveys an area that took one of the storm’s hardest hits -– Seaside Avenue. “The road was totally inundated,” he recounted. “All of the houses had water in their basements for sure or up into the first floor depending on the exact elevation of the road.” Appropriate to its name, on this sunny, if chilly, Friday afternoon, Seaside Avenue offers an array of vistas of Long Island Sound as the road transects what in earlier times was a seaside salt marsh. “…  Visit this link for the whole story on Seaside Avenue erased?

Coastal Resilience Plan link


Oct 30 2013
City trees: Urban greening needs better data


Current urban-greening programmes are all too often based on inadequate data (see, for example, C. T. Driscoll et al. BioScience 62, 354–366; 2012), and models for estimating the value of urban vegetation are largely untested. To make substantive progress towards urban sustainability, city managers and researchers need to know where, when, how and which greening programmes are appropriate for urban areas.
Simplified urban-forest models have been widely used to estimate the benefits of scattered planting of trees in city parks and avenues, but these mostly fail to build in estimates of uncertainty or to consider trade-offs and costs. For example, urban forests would be unlikely to reduce atmospheric concentrations of polluting particulates and nitrogen dioxide (H. Setälä et al. Environ. Pollut. 183, 104–112; 2013), and their high pollen density could exacerbate respiratory conditions such as asthma.
We suggest, therefore, that urban-greening strategies should be tailored specifically to their localities. Programmes need to be validated by testing against comparative studies that capture spatial and temporal variability in and among cities. This means that local urban data collection and ecosystem modelling will have to meet the same high standards as those applied to non-urban areas.

City trees: Urban greening needs better data

Current urban-greening programmes are all too often based on inadequate data (see, for example, C. T. Driscoll et al. BioScience 62, 354366; 2012), and models for estimating the value of urban vegetation are largely untested. To make substantive progress towards urban sustainability, city managers and researchers need to know where, when, how and which greening programmes are appropriate for urban areas.

Simplified urban-forest models have been widely used to estimate the benefits of scattered planting of trees in city parks and avenues, but these mostly fail to build in estimates of uncertainty or to consider trade-offs and costs. For example, urban forests would be unlikely to reduce atmospheric concentrations of polluting particulates and nitrogen dioxide (H. Setälä et al. Environ. Pollut. 183, 104112; 2013), and their high pollen density could exacerbate respiratory conditions such as asthma.

We suggest, therefore, that urban-greening strategies should be tailored specifically to their localities. Programmes need to be validated by testing against comparative studies that capture spatial and temporal variability in and among cities. This means that local urban data collection and ecosystem modelling will have to meet the same high standards as those applied to non-urban areas.


BIOSCIENCE  November  2013
How Research Ecologists Can Benefit Urban Design Projects 
Ecologists who are conducting field research usually study areas that they hope will not be disturbed for a while. But in an article published in the November issue of BioScience, “Mapping the Design Process for Urban Ecology Researchers,” Alexander J. Felson of Yale University and his colleagues describe how ecologists can perform hypothesis-driven research from the start of design through the construction and monitoring phases of major urban projects. The results from such “designed experiments” can provide site-specific data that improve how the projects are conceptualized, built, and subsequently monitored.

In light of the billions of dollars spent each year on urban construction, Felson and his coauthors see important potential in improving its environmental benefits and minimizing its harms. Currently, environmental consultants advising on the designs for such projects usually rely on available knowledge and principles that were originally tested in natural settings.

The authors note that researchers must understand contracting, then must work to establish their credentials with project designers and their clients in order to be awarded a recognized role in a construction project. Felson and colleagues therefore provide maps of the process for the researchers’ benefit. Ecologist researchers should try to involve themselves at the earliest stages, even before designing starts, and be ready to accept priorities that are alien to typical research settings.

Felson and his colleagues provide two case studies to show how it can be done. One is the construction of a “green” parking lot and associated water gardens at an environmental center in New Jersey; the other is a major tree-planting project in New York City. In both cases, researchers involved themselves during the contract phases of the projects by establishing the likely value of answering research questions. Although they had to make some compromises with commercial and political imperatives, their designed experiments allowed them to influence the design and implementation and improve environmental benefits, while also establishing viable long-term research sites in highly urbanized areas.

The complete list of peer-reviewed articles in the November 2013 issue of BioScience is as follows. These are now published ahead of print.

Mapping the Design Process for Urban Ecology ResearchersAlexander J. Felson, Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman, Timothy Carter, Franco Montalto, Bill Shuster, Nikki Springer, Emilie K. Stander, and Olyssa Starry


Involving Ecologists in Shaping Large-Scale Green Infrastructure ProjectsAlexander J. Felson, Emily E. Oldfield, and Mark A. Bradford


Timothy M. Beardsley Editor in Chief, BioScience

American Insitute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) 1900 Campus Commons Drive, Suite 200 Reston, VA 20191 703-674-2500 x326 tbeardsley@aibs.org www.aibs.org

BIOSCIENCE  November  2013

How Research Ecologists Can Benefit Urban Design Projects 

Ecologists who are conducting field research usually study areas that they hope will not be disturbed for a while. But in an article published in the November issue of BioScience, “Mapping the Design Process for Urban Ecology Researchers,” Alexander J. Felson of Yale University and his colleagues describe how ecologists can perform hypothesis-driven research from the start of design through the construction and monitoring phases of major urban projects. The results from such “designed experiments” can provide site-specific data that improve how the projects are conceptualized, built, and subsequently monitored.

In light of the billions of dollars spent each year on urban construction, Felson and his coauthors see important potential in improving its environmental benefits and minimizing its harms. Currently, environmental consultants advising on the designs for such projects usually rely on available knowledge and principles that were originally tested in natural settings.

The authors note that researchers must understand contracting, then must work to establish their credentials with project designers and their clients in order to be awarded a recognized role in a construction project. Felson and colleagues therefore provide maps of the process for the researchers’ benefit. Ecologist researchers should try to involve themselves at the earliest stages, even before designing starts, and be ready to accept priorities that are alien to typical research settings.

Felson and his colleagues provide two case studies to show how it can be done. One is the construction of a “green” parking lot and associated water gardens at an environmental center in New Jersey; the other is a major tree-planting project in New York City. In both cases, researchers involved themselves during the contract phases of the projects by establishing the likely value of answering research questions. Although they had to make some compromises with commercial and political imperatives, their designed experiments allowed them to influence the design and implementation and improve environmental benefits, while also establishing viable long-term research sites in highly urbanized areas.

The complete list of peer-reviewed articles in the November 2013 issue of BioScience is as follows. These are now published ahead of print.

Mapping the Design Process for Urban Ecology Researchers
Alexander J. Felson, Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman, Timothy Carter, Franco Montalto, Bill Shuster, Nikki Springer, Emilie K. Stander, and Olyssa Starry

Involving Ecologists in Shaping Large-Scale Green Infrastructure Projects
Alexander J. Felson, Emily E. Oldfield, and Mark A. Bradford

Timothy M. Beardsley
Editor in Chief, BioScience

American Insitute of Biological Sciences (AIBS)
1900 Campus Commons Drive, Suite 200
Reston, VA 20191
703-674-2500 x326
tbeardsley@aibs.org
www.aibs.org


We had a successful workday in Bridgeport, CT at Seaside Village working with the community to plant the bioretention gardens with a shrub planting (Iva frutescens, Hibiscus moschuetos, Clethra alnifolia, and Baccharis halimifolia) an herbaceous planting (Carex stricta, Solidago semipervens, Schizachyrium scoparium). Thanks to everyone in the community and to Selena and James for making it happen!


Oct 27 2013

Please see  BBC FUTURES called: HOW TO RELIEVE PRESSURE ON OUR STRESSED WATER RESOURCES which came out on October 25, 2013.

No resource is more vital to the survival of the human species than water. Beyond its obvious life-sustaining properties, water is a critical component for all aspects of human life. It feeds agriculture and energy production, drives industrial processes and transportation systems, and nourishes the ecosystems that we depend upon. Yet through waste and mismanagement, careless pollution, and ever-surging demand, humankind is careening toward a day when there will not be enough water for most people.

It doesn’t have to be this way. If we can focus on strategies that reduce demand and waste, establish practical policies, and apply smart technology for efficient use and monitoring, humankind can more sustainably manage this precious resource. But we must recognise that there can be no one-size-fits-all approach.


http://www.farroc.com/

On October 23rd, 2013, the jury came together to discuss proposals for the FARROC competition.  The jury deliberated for hours, eventually selecting the Stockholm based firm, White Arkitekter’s proposal Small Means and Great Ends as the overall winner, while Ennead Architects proposal were recognized for Leading Innovation in Resilient Waterfront Design.