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Jun 5 2014

Seaside Village Workday with The Nature Conservancy and  Foundation Source in Bridgeport. We cleaned out and dug the back overflow swale with the team including rock removal earthwork and grading and installation of edging. 


Jun 3 2014
For Alex Felson, opportunity knocks on Connecticut coast
Connecticut Mirror June 2, 2014http://ctmirror.org/for-alex-felson-opportunity-knocks-on-the-connecticut-coast/?hvid=3L2oEArticle on my coastal adaptation work through community consensus.

For Alex Felson, opportunity knocks on Connecticut coast

Connecticut Mirror June 2, 2014
http://ctmirror.org/for-alex-felson-opportunity-knocks-on-the-connecticut-coast/?hvid=3L2oE
Article on my coastal adaptation work through community consensus.


May 21 2014
Climate Change Is Here, How Do We Adapt?
http://wnpr.org/post/climate-change-here-how-do-we-adapt

 By John Dankosky, Tucker Ives, Lydia Brown & Catie Talarski 





The National Climate Assessment released earlier this month paints a bleak picture of the effects of climate change on not only the world - but right here in the northeast. “Climate change, once considered an issue for a distant future, has moved firmly into the present,” the report says.
We’re teaming up with The Colin McEnroe Show for a big discussion on climate change and how we’re adapting to a changing world.
GUESTS:
Adam Whelchel -  Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Connecticut and oversees the Coastal Resilience Network. He was also a Lead Author on the Northeast section of the U.S. National Climate Assessment.
Alexander Felson - Urban ecologist and Assistant Professor in Yale’s School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the Yale School of Architecture
Durland Fish - Professor of Epidemiology and of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale
David Zuckerman - Vermont state senator and a farmer at Full Moon Farm in Hinesburg, Vermont

Climate Change Is Here, How Do We Adapt?

http://wnpr.org/post/climate-change-here-how-do-we-adapt

The National Climate Assessment released earlier this month paints a bleak picture of the effects of climate change on not only the world - but right here in the northeast. “Climate change, once considered an issue for a distant future, has moved firmly into the present,” the report says.

We’re teaming up with The Colin McEnroe Show for a big discussion on climate change and how we’re adapting to a changing world.

GUESTS:


May 14 2014
Climate Change hits close to home by Bob Woods
a brief description of coastal work going on in Guilford, Connecticut www.coastalctmag.com

Climate Change hits close to home by Bob Woods

a brief description of coastal work going on in Guilford, Connecticut www.coastalctmag.com


Apr 25 2014

For Rebuild by Design- Resilient Bridgeport, our goal of reconnecting inland waterways combines economic redevelopment with environmental stewardship and risk reduction.

A Dutchman’s Opinion: Henk Ovink Weighs in on Post-Sandy Proposals - NYTimes.com - NYTimes.co    By RUSSELL SHORTO

Henk Ovink, a Dutch water management expert, briefly describes each of the 10 proposals that the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force has highlighted for possible implementation.

9. Resilient Bridgeport. (WB unabridged with Yale ARCADIS) “From its very name you know that Bridgeport is all about water. But over time it became disconnected from the water. The project uncovers streams that were covered over by urbanization. The town does not use the river as an amenity. The sound side is largely unsafe. This is an overall strategy, encompassing 10 projects to build in more safety and resilience and reconnect the city with the water.”


Apr 13 2014
Interesting NYT piece about the impact of having a dog on meeting people.  It certainly encourages conversation and social networks at the neighborhood scale.

Interesting NYT piece about the impact of having a dog on meeting people.  It certainly encourages conversation and social networks at the neighborhood scale.


From Farm to Table 
Article in the NYT about Agritopia 

By KATE MURPHYMARCH 11, 2014
This is similar to urban agriculture and ties into all of the examples of farmland transitioning into suburbs, however, in this case the housing and farm are overlapping.  Having the farm be a “legitimate” functioning farm and figuring out ways of combining housing while maintaining the farm (or adding a working farm to existing suburbs as a retrofit) seem like a good way to build community interactions.  We should build more of these.
There are other new urbanist examples of this general idea (e.g. Serenebe near Atlanta- however, there the agriculture is used more as an aesthetic and theming device with some gentleman farming).


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/12/dining/farm-to-table-living-takes-root.html

From Farm to Table

Article in the NYT about Agritopia

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/12/dining/farm-to-table-living-takes-root.html


Apr 2 2014
Rebuild by Design Public event will include the work our team has produced for Resilient Bridgeport.  We will be presenting to the jury on April 5th. 
http://www.rebuildbydesign.org/events/

Rebuild by Design Public event will include the work our team has produced for Resilient Bridgeport.  We will be presenting to the jury on April 5th.

http://www.rebuildbydesign.org/events/


Mar 19 2014
e360 article on Designed Experiments: Rebuilding the Natural World: A Shift in Ecological Restoration

From forests in Queens to wetlands in China, planners and scientists are promoting a new approach that incorporates experiments into landscape restoration projects to determine what works to the long-term benefit of nature and what does not. 
by richard conniff



link

e360 article on Designed Experiments: Rebuilding the Natural World: A Shift in Ecological Restoration

From forests in Queens to wetlands in China, planners and scientists are promoting a new approach that incorporates experiments into landscape restoration projects to determine what works to the long-term benefit of nature and what does not.

by richard conniff

link


Mar 17 2014

Joint Forestry Architecture in class charette for Rebuild by Design

As part of Applied Urban Ecology we invited Alan Plattus, Ed Mitchell and Andrei Harwell over to the UEDLAB to work through three sites as part of the Rebuild by Design competition. The focal areas included the Southend, the eastern portion of the Pequonnock and the Oxbrook Inland waterway.

TF: Caitlin Feehan. Students: Dana Baker, Ross  Bernet, Uma Bhandaram, Chung-Leong Chan, Emily Grady, Kate  Hagemann, Chris Halfnight, Angel Hertslet, Lynette  Leighton, Meghan Lewis, Shayna  Liberman, Jorge Lopez, Selena Pang, Juan Simonelli, Rebecca Schultz, Lindsay Toland, Jorge De Vincente, Lin Shi, Emily Wright


Mar 3 2014

The Urban Ecology and Design Lab at Yale is deeply involved in the Rebuild by Design competition working on coastal adaptation in Bridgeport with the WB Unabridged + Yale and Arcadis team.  See the attached workshop above which occurred over the weekend. A second event will occur on March 8th in Bridgeport. Here is the link to our team website: http://www.rebuildbydesign.org/teams/unabridged/

More information to come…


Jan 22 2014
Yale Urban Ecosystem Services Symposium
New Tools To Guide Ecosystem Management In An Urbanizing World

Panel 3: Coastal Adaptation and Resilience to Storm Events and Sea Level Rise

Time 3:00-4:00

Organizers:Alex Felson (Moderator), Keri Enright-Kato, Marit Larson, Jamie Ong, Beth Tellman


Speaker/Panel Discussion Format:  

 Introduction of panelists and framing of issues, 5 min  

Alex Felson, Assistant Professor, Yale University

Applying ecosystem services more effectively for long term coastal adaptation planning 


Panelists presentations answering questions, 10 min each

Denise Reed, Chief Scientist, Water Institute of the Gulf

How can we further integrate scientific information through the ecosystem services framework as a common language to inform ecosystem-based policy and planning for coastal adaptation?

Roselle Henn, Chief, USACE North Atlantic Division 

What are examples of useful methods and tools for facilitating coastal adaptation in terms of government, economics, infrastructure and, community activism in the local, regional, and national political context? 

 Gavin Smith, Associate Research Professor UNC; Executive Director UNC & Homeland

Given the importance of risk reduction and hazard mitigation planning, how can we link these planning tools to ecosystem services, including where and how we build in relation to natural hazards? How can we address the many trade offs associated with coastal adaptation planning given that places where people want to live are also high hazard areas (e.g. future land developments risks and ecosystem service impacts)?

 Dan Zarrilli, PE | Director of Resiliency 
NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainability

What lessons have we learned from large urban areas such as New York about reducing risks and increasing ecosystem services? Are these ideas transferable? What knowledge gaps and data needs are necessary for advancing coastal adaptation initiatives?   


Panel Discussion , 10 min
Questions from the Audience , 5 min

What ecosystem services are relevant for coastal adaptation and long-term adaptive management? How well are these ES documented and incorporated into the models used by NOAA, FEMA and USACE to address risks and work on hazard planning? In working on the challenging effort to retrofit urban coastal land, how much data is needed? How do we couple data driven models with action oriented agendas and regulations?

Yale Urban Ecosystem Services Symposium

New Tools To Guide Ecosystem Management In An Urbanizing World

Panel 3: Coastal Adaptation and Resilience to Storm Events and Sea Level Rise

Time 3:00-4:00

Organizers:Alex Felson (Moderator), Keri Enright-Kato, Marit Larson, Jamie Ong, Beth Tellman

Speaker/Panel Discussion Format:  

 Introduction of panelists and framing of issues, 5 min  

Alex Felson, Assistant Professor, Yale University

Applying ecosystem services more effectively for long term coastal adaptation planning

Panelists presentations answering questions, 10 min each

Denise Reed, Chief Scientist, Water Institute of the Gulf

How can we further integrate scientific information through the ecosystem services framework as a common language to inform ecosystem-based policy and planning for coastal adaptation?

Roselle Henn, Chief, USACE North Atlantic Division

What are examples of useful methods and tools for facilitating coastal adaptation in terms of government, economics, infrastructure and, community activism in the local, regional, and national political context?

 Gavin Smith, Associate Research Professor UNC; Executive Director UNC & Homeland

Given the importance of risk reduction and hazard mitigation planning, how can we link these planning tools to ecosystem services, including where and how we build in relation to natural hazards? How can we address the many trade offs associated with coastal adaptation planning given that places where people want to live are also high hazard areas (e.g. future land developments risks and ecosystem service impacts)?

 Dan Zarrilli, PE | Director of Resiliency 
NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainability

What lessons have we learned from large urban areas such as New York about reducing risks and increasing ecosystem services? Are these ideas transferable? What knowledge gaps and data needs are necessary for advancing coastal adaptation initiatives?   

Panel Discussion , 10 min

Questions from the Audience , 5 min

What ecosystem services are relevant for coastal adaptation and long-term adaptive management? How well are these ES documented and incorporated into the models used by NOAA, FEMA and USACE to address risks and work on hazard planning? In working on the challenging effort to retrofit urban coastal land, how much data is needed? How do we couple data driven models with action oriented agendas and regulations?


Dec 4 2013

The SOA/FES joint degree students as part of the new Student Initiated Group BE^2 organized a field trip for architecture and forestry students to the Whitney Water Treatment Tour.


Lectured at MIT’s DUSP for the Environmental Policy and Planning Group on November 12th.

Lectured at MIT’s DUSP for the Environmental Policy and Planning Group on November 12th.


Nov 21 2013

Future Directions in Urban Ecology and Ecological Design.
Tuesday, November 19th   
4:00 – 5:45
Burke Auditorium


Join Urban Ecologists Peter Groffman, Diane Pataki and Alex Felson as they engage in a discussion with Yale School of Architecture faculty about urban ecological theories, methods, and tools.
 Brainstorm with them on methods to translate scientific information into tangible meaning for design.
 
Questions to be raised are:
-        How do we choose what metrics to study and what methods to apply for design?
-        How should we move forward in designing and constructing buildings and landscapes and measure their performance?
-        Are there design enhancements that can affect ecological processes and improve the environmental performance of urban areas?
-        How can experiments be implemented to study/design ecosystem process interactions in urban and suburban areas?


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