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Jul 31 2014

UEDLAB wins NSF in Environmental Sustainability:

Yale Project Aims to Propel Green Walls into the Mainstream

Yale researchers have received a $299,000 federal grant to develop a new class of “green wall” technologies that they say could ultimately replace the cooling towers used for a wide range of processes, from utility-scale power operations to home-cooling systems.

A team of Yale researchers has received National Science Foundation funding to develop a new class of “green wall” technologies capable of rejecting waste heat for a range of processes — from utility-scale power operations to home-cooling systems — a potentially valuable green infrastructure alternative to the cooling towers that have become ubiquitous worldwide.
 
During a three-year study, the team will test and evaluate green wall prototypes that incorporate a “heat rejection” function — a process in which cooler water is used to extract waste heat from water streams in built systems — while still achieving the benefits associated with typical green wall systems.
 
Green walls, which are also known as living walls, are vegetation-covered walls located on the exterior of buildings that can improve the energy performance and water management of the structure, reduce the urban heat island effect, and provide other valuable ecosystem services.
 
Yet despite their practical and ecological benefits, the high implementation and maintenance costs have made green wall technologies something of a niche product, said Alexander Felson, co-principal investigator of the project and assistant professor at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies (F&ES) and the Yale School of Architecture.
If you can incorporate active heat rejection into green walls… it’s possible that we can expand the clientele to include any industry, institution, or even homeowners.
— Alexander Felson
A green wall that can also perform the function of heat rejection has the potential to complement or replace cooling towers, which typically achieve that task for systems of all sizes across the industrial and urban landscape. The technology, researchers say, could become an attractive option for large-scale utility customers, big box department stores, and urban buildings. It might also bring the efficiency benefits of wet heat rejection to smaller building cooling systems.
 
“There is real potential to expand green wall technologies into a whole new set of markets,” Felson said. “If you can incorporate active heat rejection into green walls — and illustrate the ecosystem service benefits — it’s possible that we can expand the clientele to include any industry, institution, or even homeowners.”
 
Like cooling towers, the green walls would perform heat rejection through evaporation and convection. And for both technologies the water used to extract waste heat is lost to the atmosphere. However, green walls would utilize the re-circulated water for several additional functions, such as maintaining plants and soil organisms, graywater management for buildings, and microclimate moderation, researchers say.
 
In addition, the green wall systems would not produce “blow-down” water, which is high-mineral wastewater contaminated with the biocides and corrosive inhibitors used in cooling tower operations.
 
A key challenge will be identifying plant and substrate combinations that support heat rejection while allowing plants to perform in higher water temperatures and with wetter roots.
 
During the project, the researchers will conduct greenhouse and field studies to test heat rejection, water treatment, and plant and substrate performance alongside mathematicalmodelsto calibrate and/or validate the results.
 
Felson worked closely with co-principal investigator James Axley, a Senior Research Scholar at F&ES and Professor Emeritus at the Yale School of Architecture, to develop the thermal green wall concepts. Together they have two provisional patents for the technology. A third investigator, Graeme Berlyn, the E.H. Harriman Professor of Forest Management and Physiology of Trees at F&ES, will focus on the plant physiology and substrates.
 
The researchers are working with EcoWalls, LLC. a nationally recognized design-build company with greenhouse facilities that has produced numerous advancesin green wall plants, irrigation, and substrates.
 
The $299,000 grant is funded by the National Science Foundation’s Environmental Sustainability program.

– Kevin Dennehy    kevin.dennehy@yale.edu    203 436-4842


2014 Earth Stewardship Initiative Demonstration Project: sustaining and enhancing Earth’s life-support systems

The American River Parkway at the nexus of ecological science and design


99th Annual Meeting The Ecological Society of AmericaPress*Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, July 28, 2014 Contact: Alison Mize 703-625-3628; Alison@esa.org

“Cities that Work for People and Ecosystems” is the theme for a full week of demonstration projects in the Sacramento’s American River Parkway from August 10−15 during the Ecological Society of America’s annual meeting. The 23-mile long Parkway faces multiple competing demands for water, flood control, habitat and recreation.
Blending ecological research and applied ecological understanding with landscape management can inform the design and management of the Parkway for long-term adaptive management.  A host of ecologists working with local urban planners, flood system managers and landscape architects will combine scientific experiments with landscape design. Field site installations along the American River and displays in the Sacramento Convention Center will compliment a robust schedule of special sessions and workshops during the week.
The 119-mile long American River headwaters begin in California’s High Sierra Nevada mountain range. The river plays an important role in the area’s history as gold was first discovered on along its banks in 1848, which ignited the Gold Rush. The almost 500,000 residents that call Sacramento home consider the American River Parkway the crown jewel of their city. Recreational opportunities abound along its 23-mile stretch of forests, beaches, bike paths and hiking trails.
The demonstration project is part of the Ecological Society of America’s Earth Stewardship Initiative, which seeks to provide the scientific basis for actively shaping trajectories of social-ecological change to enhance ecosystem resilience and human well-being. Human activities affect Earth’s life support systems so profoundly as to threaten many of the ecological services that are essential to society. Society has a window of opportunity in the next few decades to redefine our relationship with the planet to reduce risks of dangerous global changes. Ecologists are seeking to address this challenge with a new science agenda that integrates people with the rest of nature to chart a sustainable relationship between society and the biosphere.
“What better way to illustrate how the science of ecology can be put to use than with a demonstration project woven into ESAs annual meeting?” said ESA President Jill Baron.  “Many of our ecologists embrace the idea of using their knowledge for the public good; the American River Parkway provides a great example of ecologists working with practitioners to promote more sustainable urban ecosystems.”

Ecological Society of America’s 99th Annual Meeting, August 10-15th, 2014, in Sacramento, Cal.
Main * Program * Press Information * App
2014 Earth Stewardship Initiative Schedule
Many sessions, field trips and demonstration projects will delve into the benefits of ecological science and its applications that are useful for urban design, planning and adaptive management.

Field Trip 10:  Urban Bioblitz Along The American River CorridorSunday, August 10, 2014: 8:30 AM-3:00 PM, J Street Entrance, Sacramento Convention Center
The American River Parkway within Sacramento is the site for this field trip’s urban bioblitz. ESA organizers will be joined by US Fish and Wildlife Service wildlife biologists and volunteers from the American River Parkway Foundation to help conduct an the bioblitz. Participants will collect and identify the biodiversity along the corridor in teams that will focus on plant diversity, birds, insects and macro aquatic invertebrates.  A reference collection from the bioblitz will be given to the local community.
Organizer: Gillian Bowser  gbowser@colostate.edu Co-organizers: Harold Balbach and Luben Dimov

Field Trip 14:  Ecological Planning and Design Along the American River ParkwayMonday, August 11, 2014: 8:00 AM-1:00 PM, J Street Entrance, Sacramento Convention Center
This field trip is designed as an exploration of the American River Parkway employing ecological principles into the design landscapes to perform ecosystem services.
Organizer: Alexander J. Felson   alexander.felson@yale.edu Co-organizer: Neal M. Williams

Special Session 8:  From Studying To Shaping: A Design Charette Bridging Site Analysis To Conceptual Design Monday, August 11, 2014: 10:15 AM-11:30 AM, Camellia, Sheraton Hotel
Using the American River Parkway as a case study, this session provides an educational opportunity for ecologists to develop collaborative activities that build ecological resilience and sustainability principles into urban planning and landscape architecture.
Organizer: Alexander J. Felson   alexander.felson@yale.edu Co-organizer: Jill Baron

Special Session 7:  Engaging with Business and Industry to Advance Earth Stewardship – Business and BiodiversityMonday, August 11, 2014: 10:15 AM-11:30 AM, 204, Sacramento Convention Center
This session builds on ESA’s Earth Stewardship initiative to explore solutions that will help redefine our relationship with the planet and reduce the risks of degrading Earth’s life-support systems. It is the latest in a series of conversations, workshops, and demonstration projects from universities, agencies, land managers, religious communities and businesses.
Organizer: Jill Baron  Jill.Baron@colostate.eduCo-organizers: Scott L. Collins, David W. Inouye, Teresa Mourad, Clifford Duke and Katherine McCarter

Symposia 14:  Green Cities: Ecology and Design in Urban LandscapesWednesday, August 13, 2014: 1:30 PM-5:00 PM, Gardenia, Sheraton Hotel
Over 50% of all humans now live in cities with increasing demands on sustainable water and food systems, waste infrastructure, social networks and human health. This symposium will explicitly feature examples of the synthesis of ecology and design in urban landscapes.
Organizer: Sharon K. Collinge   Sharon.collinge@colorado.edu Co-organizers: Ari E. Novy and Alexander J. Felson

Workshop 38:  From Studying to Shaping Land: A Workshop Bridging Ecology with Design Performance ObjectivesWednesday, August 13, 2014: 8:00 PM-10:00 PM, 104, Sacramento Convention Center
Using the case study of the American River Parkway, this workshop will explore ways of extending the scope and rigor of a leading international program, the Landscape Architecture Foundation’s Landscape Performance Series, to monitor and evaluate landscape solutions using environmental, economic and social outcomes as proposed design alternatives.
Organizer: Alexander J. Felson  alexander.felson@yale.edu Co-organizers: Timothy Carter and  Emilie K. Stander

SYMP 24:  Ecological Design and Planning for Ecologists: Applying Earth StewardshipFriday, August 15, 2014: 8:00 AM-11:30 AM, Magnolia, Sheraton Hotel
Ecology is undergoing a transformation from a field historically disengaged from the human- built environment to one that can provide insight into the understanding, design, and management of urbanized land. This symposium will present ecological design and ecosystem-based management strategies for large-scale green infrastructure and engineering projects.
Organizer: Alexander J. Felson   alexander.felson@yale.edu

Journalists and public information officers can gain access to full texts of all ESA publications by contacting the public affairs office. Email Liza Lester, llester@esa.org.
The Ecological Society of America is the world’s largest community of professional ecologists and a trusted source of ecological knowledge. ESA is committed to advancing the understanding of life on Earth. The 10,000 member Society publishes five journals, convenes an annual scientific conference, and broadly shares ecological information through policy and media outreach and education initiatives. Visit the ESA website at http://www.esa.org.
To subscribe to ESA press releases, contact Liza Lester at llester@esa.org.


1990 M Street, NW | Suite 700 | Washington, DC 20036 | phone 202-833-8773 | fax 202-833-8775 | email esahq@esa.org

2014 Earth Stewardship Initiative Demonstration Project: sustaining and enhancing Earth’s life-support systems

The American River Parkway at the nexus of ecological science and design

ESA2014 Sacramento logo

99th Annual Meeting
The Ecological Society of America
Press*Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday, July 28, 2014
Contact: Alison Mize 703-625-3628; Alison@esa.org

“Cities that Work for People and Ecosystems” is the theme for a full week of demonstration projects in the Sacramento’s American River Parkway from August 10−15 during the Ecological Society of America’s annual meeting. The 23-mile long Parkway faces multiple competing demands for water, flood control, habitat and recreation.

Blending ecological research and applied ecological understanding with landscape management can inform the design and management of the Parkway for long-term adaptive management.  A host of ecologists working with local urban planners, flood system managers and landscape architects will combine scientific experiments with landscape design. Field site installations along the American River and displays in the Sacramento Convention Center will compliment a robust schedule of special sessions and workshops during the week.

The 119-mile long American River headwaters begin in California’s High Sierra Nevada mountain range. The river plays an important role in the area’s history as gold was first discovered on along its banks in 1848, which ignited the Gold Rush. The almost 500,000 residents that call Sacramento home consider the American River Parkway the crown jewel of their city. Recreational opportunities abound along its 23-mile stretch of forests, beaches, bike paths and hiking trails.

The demonstration project is part of the Ecological Society of America’s Earth Stewardship Initiative, which seeks to provide the scientific basis for actively shaping trajectories of social-ecological change to enhance ecosystem resilience and human well-being. Human activities affect Earth’s life support systems so profoundly as to threaten many of the ecological services that are essential to society. Society has a window of opportunity in the next few decades to redefine our relationship with the planet to reduce risks of dangerous global changes. Ecologists are seeking to address this challenge with a new science agenda that integrates people with the rest of nature to chart a sustainable relationship between society and the biosphere.

“What better way to illustrate how the science of ecology can be put to use than with a demonstration project woven into ESAs annual meeting?” said ESA President Jill Baron.  “Many of our ecologists embrace the idea of using their knowledge for the public good; the American River Parkway provides a great example of ecologists working with practitioners to promote more sustainable urban ecosystems.”


Ecological Society of America’s 99th Annual Meeting, August 10-15th, 2014, in Sacramento, Cal.

Main * Program * Press Information * App

2014 Earth Stewardship Initiative Schedule

Many sessions, field trips and demonstration projects will delve into the benefits of ecological science and its applications that are useful for urban design, planning and adaptive management.

Field Trip 10:  Urban Bioblitz Along The American River Corridor
Sunday, August 10, 2014: 8:30 AM-3:00 PM, J Street Entrance, Sacramento Convention Center

The American River Parkway within Sacramento is the site for this field trip’s urban bioblitz. ESA organizers will be joined by US Fish and Wildlife Service wildlife biologists and volunteers from the American River Parkway Foundation to help conduct an the bioblitz. Participants will collect and identify the biodiversity along the corridor in teams that will focus on plant diversity, birds, insects and macro aquatic invertebrates.  A reference collection from the bioblitz will be given to the local community.

Organizer: Gillian Bowser  gbowser@colostate.edu
Co-organizers: Harold Balbach and Luben Dimov

Field Trip 14:  Ecological Planning and Design Along the American River Parkway
Monday, August 11, 2014: 8:00 AM-1:00 PM, J Street Entrance, Sacramento Convention Center

This field trip is designed as an exploration of the American River Parkway employing ecological principles into the design landscapes to perform ecosystem services.

Organizer: Alexander J. Felson   alexander.felson@yale.edu
Co-organizer: Neal M. Williams

Special Session 8:  From Studying To Shaping: A Design Charette Bridging Site Analysis To Conceptual Design
Monday, August 11, 2014: 10:15 AM-11:30 AM, Camellia, Sheraton Hotel

Using the American River Parkway as a case study, this session provides an educational opportunity for ecologists to develop collaborative activities that build ecological resilience and sustainability principles into urban planning and landscape architecture.

Organizer: Alexander J. Felson   alexander.felson@yale.edu
Co-organizer: Jill Baron

Special Session 7:  Engaging with Business and Industry to Advance Earth Stewardship – Business and Biodiversity
Monday, August 11, 2014: 10:15 AM-11:30 AM, 204, Sacramento Convention Center

This session builds on ESA’s Earth Stewardship initiative to explore solutions that will help redefine our relationship with the planet and reduce the risks of degrading Earth’s life-support systems. It is the latest in a series of conversations, workshops, and demonstration projects from universities, agencies, land managers, religious communities and businesses.

Organizer: Jill Baron  Jill.Baron@colostate.edu
Co-organizers: Scott L. Collins, David W. Inouye, Teresa Mourad, Clifford Duke and Katherine McCarter

Symposia 14:  Green Cities: Ecology and Design in Urban Landscapes
Wednesday, August 13, 2014: 1:30 PM-5:00 PM, Gardenia, Sheraton Hotel

Over 50% of all humans now live in cities with increasing demands on sustainable water and food systems, waste infrastructure, social networks and human health. This symposium will explicitly feature examples of the synthesis of ecology and design in urban landscapes.

Organizer: Sharon K. Collinge   Sharon.collinge@colorado.edu
Co-organizers: Ari E. Novy and Alexander J. Felson

Workshop 38:  From Studying to Shaping Land: A Workshop Bridging Ecology with Design Performance Objectives
Wednesday, August 13, 2014: 8:00 PM-10:00 PM, 104, Sacramento Convention Center

Using the case study of the American River Parkway, this workshop will explore ways of extending the scope and rigor of a leading international program, the Landscape Architecture Foundation’s Landscape Performance Series, to monitor and evaluate landscape solutions using environmental, economic and social outcomes as proposed design alternatives.

Organizer: Alexander J. Felson  alexander.felson@yale.edu
Co-organizers: Timothy Carter and  Emilie K. Stander

SYMP 24:  Ecological Design and Planning for Ecologists: Applying Earth Stewardship
Friday, August 15, 2014: 8:00 AM-11:30 AM, Magnolia, Sheraton Hotel

Ecology is undergoing a transformation from a field historically disengaged from the human- built environment to one that can provide insight into the understanding, design, and management of urbanized land. This symposium will present ecological design and ecosystem-based management strategies for large-scale green infrastructure and engineering projects.

Organizer: Alexander J. Felson   alexander.felson@yale.edu


Journalists and public information officers can gain access to full texts of all ESA publications by contacting the public affairs office. Email Liza Lester, llester@esa.org.

The Ecological Society of America is the world’s largest community of professional ecologists and a trusted source of ecological knowledge. ESA is committed to advancing the understanding of life on Earth. The 10,000 member Society publishes five journals, convenes an annual scientific conference, and broadly shares ecological information through policy and media outreach and education initiatives. Visit the ESA website at http://www.esa.org.

To subscribe to ESA press releases, contact Liza Lester at llester@esa.org.

1990 M Street, NW | Suite 700 | Washington, DC 20036 | phone 202-833-8773 | fax 202-833-8775 | email esahq@esa.org


Rethinking the Wild: The Wilderness Act Is Facing a Midlife Crisis

By CHRISTOPHER SOLOMONJULY 5, 2014 New York Times

This is a well-formed argument suggesting a hands-on approach is needed to address global warming. “The real conundrum [states Cat Hawkins Hoffman, of the National Park Service], is how much manipulation in wilderness is acceptable in order to protect the values for which the wilderness was established.” The article recommends a variety of strategies from irrigating high value habitats that are increasingly dry (like the Redwoods in California), intervening in landscapes to make them more resilient (including erosion control and infiltration), creating disease resistant seed stock to augment struggling plant communities and assisting with plant migration to accommodate global warming.  “In short, we need to accept our role as reluctant gardeners.”

Rethinking the Wild: The Wilderness Act Is Facing a Midlife Crisis

By CHRISTOPHER SOLOMONJULY 5, 2014 New York Times

This is a well-formed argument suggesting a hands-on approach is needed to address global warming. “The real conundrum [states Cat Hawkins Hoffman, of the National Park Service], is how much manipulation in wilderness is acceptable in order to protect the values for which the wilderness was established.” The article recommends a variety of strategies from irrigating high value habitats that are increasingly dry (like the Redwoods in California), intervening in landscapes to make them more resilient (including erosion control and infiltration), creating disease resistant seed stock to augment struggling plant communities and assisting with plant migration to accommodate global warming.  In short, we need to accept our role as reluctant gardeners.”


Jun 5 2014

Seaside Village Workday with The Nature Conservancy and  Foundation Source in Bridgeport. We cleaned out and dug the back overflow swale with the team including rock removal earthwork and grading and installation of edging. 


Jun 3 2014
For Alex Felson, opportunity knocks on Connecticut coast
Connecticut Mirror June 2, 2014http://ctmirror.org/for-alex-felson-opportunity-knocks-on-the-connecticut-coast/?hvid=3L2oEArticle on my coastal adaptation work through community consensus.

For Alex Felson, opportunity knocks on Connecticut coast

Connecticut Mirror June 2, 2014
http://ctmirror.org/for-alex-felson-opportunity-knocks-on-the-connecticut-coast/?hvid=3L2oE
Article on my coastal adaptation work through community consensus.


May 21 2014
Climate Change Is Here, How Do We Adapt?
http://wnpr.org/post/climate-change-here-how-do-we-adapt

 By John Dankosky, Tucker Ives, Lydia Brown & Catie Talarski 





The National Climate Assessment released earlier this month paints a bleak picture of the effects of climate change on not only the world - but right here in the northeast. “Climate change, once considered an issue for a distant future, has moved firmly into the present,” the report says.
We’re teaming up with The Colin McEnroe Show for a big discussion on climate change and how we’re adapting to a changing world.
GUESTS:
Adam Whelchel -  Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Connecticut and oversees the Coastal Resilience Network. He was also a Lead Author on the Northeast section of the U.S. National Climate Assessment.
Alexander Felson - Urban ecologist and Assistant Professor in Yale’s School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the Yale School of Architecture
Durland Fish - Professor of Epidemiology and of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale
David Zuckerman - Vermont state senator and a farmer at Full Moon Farm in Hinesburg, Vermont

Climate Change Is Here, How Do We Adapt?

http://wnpr.org/post/climate-change-here-how-do-we-adapt

The National Climate Assessment released earlier this month paints a bleak picture of the effects of climate change on not only the world - but right here in the northeast. “Climate change, once considered an issue for a distant future, has moved firmly into the present,” the report says.

We’re teaming up with The Colin McEnroe Show for a big discussion on climate change and how we’re adapting to a changing world.

GUESTS:


May 14 2014
Climate Change hits close to home by Bob Woods
a brief description of coastal work going on in Guilford, Connecticut www.coastalctmag.com

Climate Change hits close to home by Bob Woods

a brief description of coastal work going on in Guilford, Connecticut www.coastalctmag.com


Apr 25 2014

For Rebuild by Design- Resilient Bridgeport, our goal of reconnecting inland waterways combines economic redevelopment with environmental stewardship and risk reduction.

A Dutchman’s Opinion: Henk Ovink Weighs in on Post-Sandy Proposals - NYTimes.com - NYTimes.co    By RUSSELL SHORTO

Henk Ovink, a Dutch water management expert, briefly describes each of the 10 proposals that the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force has highlighted for possible implementation.

9. Resilient Bridgeport. (WB unabridged with Yale ARCADIS) “From its very name you know that Bridgeport is all about water. But over time it became disconnected from the water. The project uncovers streams that were covered over by urbanization. The town does not use the river as an amenity. The sound side is largely unsafe. This is an overall strategy, encompassing 10 projects to build in more safety and resilience and reconnect the city with the water.”


Apr 13 2014
Interesting NYT piece about the impact of having a dog on meeting people.  It certainly encourages conversation and social networks at the neighborhood scale.

Interesting NYT piece about the impact of having a dog on meeting people.  It certainly encourages conversation and social networks at the neighborhood scale.


From Farm to Table 
Article in the NYT about Agritopia 

By KATE MURPHYMARCH 11, 2014
This is similar to urban agriculture and ties into all of the examples of farmland transitioning into suburbs, however, in this case the housing and farm are overlapping.  Having the farm be a “legitimate” functioning farm and figuring out ways of combining housing while maintaining the farm (or adding a working farm to existing suburbs as a retrofit) seem like a good way to build community interactions.  We should build more of these.
There are other new urbanist examples of this general idea (e.g. Serenebe near Atlanta- however, there the agriculture is used more as an aesthetic and theming device with some gentleman farming).


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/12/dining/farm-to-table-living-takes-root.html

From Farm to Table

Article in the NYT about Agritopia

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/12/dining/farm-to-table-living-takes-root.html


Apr 2 2014
Rebuild by Design Public event will include the work our team has produced for Resilient Bridgeport.  We will be presenting to the jury on April 5th. 
http://www.rebuildbydesign.org/events/

Rebuild by Design Public event will include the work our team has produced for Resilient Bridgeport.  We will be presenting to the jury on April 5th.

http://www.rebuildbydesign.org/events/


Mar 19 2014
e360 article on Designed Experiments: Rebuilding the Natural World: A Shift in Ecological Restoration

From forests in Queens to wetlands in China, planners and scientists are promoting a new approach that incorporates experiments into landscape restoration projects to determine what works to the long-term benefit of nature and what does not. 
by richard conniff



link

e360 article on Designed Experiments: Rebuilding the Natural World: A Shift in Ecological Restoration

From forests in Queens to wetlands in China, planners and scientists are promoting a new approach that incorporates experiments into landscape restoration projects to determine what works to the long-term benefit of nature and what does not.

by richard conniff

link


Mar 17 2014

Joint Forestry Architecture in class charette for Rebuild by Design

As part of Applied Urban Ecology we invited Alan Plattus, Ed Mitchell and Andrei Harwell over to the UEDLAB to work through three sites as part of the Rebuild by Design competition. The focal areas included the Southend, the eastern portion of the Pequonnock and the Oxbrook Inland waterway.

TF: Caitlin Feehan. Students: Dana Baker, Ross  Bernet, Uma Bhandaram, Chung-Leong Chan, Emily Grady, Kate  Hagemann, Chris Halfnight, Angel Hertslet, Lynette  Leighton, Meghan Lewis, Shayna  Liberman, Jorge Lopez, Selena Pang, Juan Simonelli, Rebecca Schultz, Lindsay Toland, Jorge De Vincente, Lin Shi, Emily Wright


Mar 3 2014

The Urban Ecology and Design Lab at Yale is deeply involved in the Rebuild by Design competition working on coastal adaptation in Bridgeport with the WB Unabridged + Yale and Arcadis team.  See the attached workshop above which occurred over the weekend. A second event will occur on March 8th in Bridgeport. Here is the link to our team website: http://www.rebuildbydesign.org/teams/unabridged/

More information to come…


Jan 22 2014
Yale Urban Ecosystem Services Symposium
New Tools To Guide Ecosystem Management In An Urbanizing World

Panel 3: Coastal Adaptation and Resilience to Storm Events and Sea Level Rise

Time 3:00-4:00

Organizers:Alex Felson (Moderator), Keri Enright-Kato, Marit Larson, Jamie Ong, Beth Tellman


Speaker/Panel Discussion Format:  

 Introduction of panelists and framing of issues, 5 min  

Alex Felson, Assistant Professor, Yale University

Applying ecosystem services more effectively for long term coastal adaptation planning 


Panelists presentations answering questions, 10 min each

Denise Reed, Chief Scientist, Water Institute of the Gulf

How can we further integrate scientific information through the ecosystem services framework as a common language to inform ecosystem-based policy and planning for coastal adaptation?

Roselle Henn, Chief, USACE North Atlantic Division 

What are examples of useful methods and tools for facilitating coastal adaptation in terms of government, economics, infrastructure and, community activism in the local, regional, and national political context? 

 Gavin Smith, Associate Research Professor UNC; Executive Director UNC & Homeland

Given the importance of risk reduction and hazard mitigation planning, how can we link these planning tools to ecosystem services, including where and how we build in relation to natural hazards? How can we address the many trade offs associated with coastal adaptation planning given that places where people want to live are also high hazard areas (e.g. future land developments risks and ecosystem service impacts)?

 Dan Zarrilli, PE | Director of Resiliency 
NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainability

What lessons have we learned from large urban areas such as New York about reducing risks and increasing ecosystem services? Are these ideas transferable? What knowledge gaps and data needs are necessary for advancing coastal adaptation initiatives?   


Panel Discussion , 10 min
Questions from the Audience , 5 min

What ecosystem services are relevant for coastal adaptation and long-term adaptive management? How well are these ES documented and incorporated into the models used by NOAA, FEMA and USACE to address risks and work on hazard planning? In working on the challenging effort to retrofit urban coastal land, how much data is needed? How do we couple data driven models with action oriented agendas and regulations?

Yale Urban Ecosystem Services Symposium

New Tools To Guide Ecosystem Management In An Urbanizing World

Panel 3: Coastal Adaptation and Resilience to Storm Events and Sea Level Rise

Time 3:00-4:00

Organizers:Alex Felson (Moderator), Keri Enright-Kato, Marit Larson, Jamie Ong, Beth Tellman

Speaker/Panel Discussion Format:  

 Introduction of panelists and framing of issues, 5 min  

Alex Felson, Assistant Professor, Yale University

Applying ecosystem services more effectively for long term coastal adaptation planning

Panelists presentations answering questions, 10 min each

Denise Reed, Chief Scientist, Water Institute of the Gulf

How can we further integrate scientific information through the ecosystem services framework as a common language to inform ecosystem-based policy and planning for coastal adaptation?

Roselle Henn, Chief, USACE North Atlantic Division

What are examples of useful methods and tools for facilitating coastal adaptation in terms of government, economics, infrastructure and, community activism in the local, regional, and national political context?

 Gavin Smith, Associate Research Professor UNC; Executive Director UNC & Homeland

Given the importance of risk reduction and hazard mitigation planning, how can we link these planning tools to ecosystem services, including where and how we build in relation to natural hazards? How can we address the many trade offs associated with coastal adaptation planning given that places where people want to live are also high hazard areas (e.g. future land developments risks and ecosystem service impacts)?

 Dan Zarrilli, PE | Director of Resiliency 
NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainability

What lessons have we learned from large urban areas such as New York about reducing risks and increasing ecosystem services? Are these ideas transferable? What knowledge gaps and data needs are necessary for advancing coastal adaptation initiatives?   

Panel Discussion , 10 min

Questions from the Audience , 5 min

What ecosystem services are relevant for coastal adaptation and long-term adaptive management? How well are these ES documented and incorporated into the models used by NOAA, FEMA and USACE to address risks and work on hazard planning? In working on the challenging effort to retrofit urban coastal land, how much data is needed? How do we couple data driven models with action oriented agendas and regulations?


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